The Expeditionists

  • Posted on May 22, 2012 by

As the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) intern for 2012, I am fortunate to be spending time at all three New York Art Resources Consortium (NYARC) libraries. The Frick Art Reference Library and those of the Brooklyn Museum and The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) share many attributes. One of these is the important role that collecting expeditions played in increasing the holdings of each institution. Interestingly, in the early twentieth century these libraries supported major expeditions that were led by women. These bold travelers came from a variety of backgrounds and socioeconomic classes and were ahead of their time.


Making Millennium Magazines

  • Posted on Apr 04, 2012 by

As we were brainstorming a name for our Library exhibition of contemporary experimental magazines, Millennium Magazines stuck because of its concise alliteration. The name also specifically isolates this recent period of time - post-Y2K - where these publications have been flourishing despite constant conversations about the end of print culture. Working in a library, this is a particularly hot topic as we think about the future and how best to accommodate new modes of publishing. The exhibition, now on view at MoMA in the Lewis B. Cullman Education building at 4 W 54th St., aims to complicate this assumption that print is dead.


Dutch Connection: Conceptual Art at MoMA Library

  • Posted on Oct 28, 2011 by

After spending the past six months processing the Art & Project/Depot VBVR Gift as Project Cataloger to the MoMA Library it seems timely to report on the venerable cache of materials. These materials are incorporated to the library collection as a gift from Adriaan van Ravesteijn, co-founder of the preeminent gallery for Conceptual Art in Amsterdam, Art & Project, which ceased operations in 2001 after 30 years of programming. The Art & Project/Depot VBVR Gift arrived at the library summer 2010, with materials reflecting relationships with the artists represented in the gallery program, including materials ranging from rare exhibition catalogs and artists’ books to monographs and ephemera.


Where Questions Go

  • Posted on Sep 29, 2011 by

My colleague Lauren Adelman stopped by the reference desk a while back. What do you have on murals, she asked.  I knew this would be interesting. Lauren works with MoMA’s Community and Access Programs, partnering with organizations involved with the criminal justice system.  This is part of her broader work as New York Director of Artistic Noise.  I was right: she was working with young men at the Bronx Residential Center to create a mural for their main entryway.


From Scrabble to Crossword Puzzles and Beyond

  • Posted on Aug 16, 2011 by

Attention, logophiles!  We invite you to visit the Frick Art Reference Library and The Museum of Modern Art Library to acquaint yourself with the Oxford English Dictionary Online (OED).  Logophiles, or lovers of words, will be pleased to know that the OED is replete with more than 600,000 entries that include contemporary meanings of words as well as their corresponding chronological history and evolution.  The OED includes great ways to learn how to get the most out of this online dictionary, including quizzes for those who are up for the challenge.


Film Special Collections 100% More Findable!

  • Posted on Jul 05, 2011 by

Ok, they were previously 0% findable. Still, by adding the MoMA Film Department Special Collections inventory to the MoMA web site, film researchers can now discover over 100 primary-source collections on film-related figures and topics. The processed (and partially-processed) collections include papers on individuals (filmmakers, distributors, animators, actors), studios (Biograph, Edison, Kalem), and groups (Film and Photo League).


Domes Were the New Homes

  • Posted on May 20, 2011 by

When studying the collection at MoMA Library, we often reveal compelling stories of how certain books were produced and how these objects travelled through the world. With experimental art and design publications of the 20th century, part of the story of a book’s history relates to its circulation from the hands of friends to a wider audience, into the collections of museums and libraries.


Pages