Inside the Parisian Studio

  • Posted on Dec 19, 2011 by

Libraries can contain unexpected treasures. Who would have guessed that the Frick Art Reference Library possesses a collection of seventy-four photographs of artists in their Paris studios circa 1885 to 1892? The photographs were given to the Library in 1940 by the American polar artist Frank Wilbert Stokes (1858–1955). Stokes had much earlier (1916–19) tried unsuccessfully to persuade Henry Clay Frick (1849–1919) to visit his studio and buy some of his paintings.  


Documenting the Digital: Behind the Scenes of the Gilded Age Project

  • Posted on Dec 07, 2011 by

The recently completed NYARC digitization project “Documenting the Gilded Age: New York City Exhibitions at the Turn of the 20th Century,” was the product of a collaboration between the Frick Art Reference Library and the Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archive. Like many collaborative digital projects, “Documenting Gilded Age” exposed both the challenges and unique opportunities that come from transforming physical items – in this case rare, ephemeral exhibition catalogs – into digital form.


Gilded Age New York

  • Posted on Nov 16, 2011 by

The art exhibitions of small galleries, society clubs, and associations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries chronicle the emergence of New York City as a metropolis destined to be a global center for the international art market. Ephemeral exhibition catalogs, checklists, and pamphlets from this period document artistic movements, artists of the period, economic markets, and social and cultural history. The materials from eleven galleries, clubs, and associations that have played a pivotal role in the history of art and New York City have been digitized from the collections of the Frick Art Reference Library and the Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives and are now available to researchers worldwide. Spanning the period from 1875 to 1922, this initial collection serves as the foundation for a more comprehensive project to document the New York City art scene at the turn of the 20th century.


Crikey! Frick Acquires Trove of Australiana

  • Posted on Oct 10, 2011 by

Australia is about as far from New York as one can travel.  However, the three NYARC libraries have a small but important collection of materials about Australian art that brings the country from down under to the United States. In May and June 2011, the Frick Art Reference Library acquired 150 Australian exhibition catalogs. The majority of these catalogs are not widely available, with the Frick being the only library in the United States to own copies of some of the titles. Added to works about Aboriginal and post-WWII Australian art at the libraries of the Brooklyn Museum and The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Frick’s recent acquisition helps to form a high-quality consortial collection related to art in Australia.


Hidden Wonders

  • Posted on Sep 13, 2011 by

Jesse Sadia, Cataloging Associate for Auction Sales Catalogs, established the staff exhibition program at The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library in 1999 as a means for artists on staff to get to know one another and to create a display of works that their colleagues could enjoy. The first exhibition, Small Works, occupied two bookshelves. It invited artists in the Library to create pieces no larger than 2 x 2 inches. The next year the exhibition was expanded to include all employees of the Frick and became part of the institution’s annual Staff Education Day activities. Twelve years later the program is still going strong.


From Scrabble to Crossword Puzzles and Beyond

  • Posted on Aug 16, 2011 by

Attention, logophiles!  We invite you to visit the Frick Art Reference Library and The Museum of Modern Art Library to acquaint yourself with the Oxford English Dictionary Online (OED).  Logophiles, or lovers of words, will be pleased to know that the OED is replete with more than 600,000 entries that include contemporary meanings of words as well as their corresponding chronological history and evolution.  The OED includes great ways to learn how to get the most out of this online dictionary, including quizzes for those who are up for the challenge.


A Rose by Any Other Name

  • Posted on Mar 22, 2011 by

New York is already getting a much-needed taste of spring through The Roses—an installation on Park Avenue between 57th and 67th streets—by contemporary artist Will Ryman. The larger-than-life sculptures of roses and rose petals in different shades of pink makes this writer daydream of warm days to come. The project is sponsored by the Department of Parks & Recreation and the Fund for the Park Avenue Sculpture Committee in conjunction with Paul Kasmin Gallery and is on display through the end of May.


Pages