Art of the Park

  • Posted on Nov 23, 2015 by

Central Park’s seven hundred-plus acres make up a nearly perfect rectangle with north, south, east, and west ends, smack dab in the middle of the Manhattan street grid. In the city, no one can escape the park. And even in the park, no one can escape the city, apparent in the skylines of 59th Street, Fifth Avenue, Central Park West, and 110th Street.


Frick Art Reference Library Fossils

  • Posted on Oct 04, 2015 by

The American architect John Russell Pope (1874-1937) designed the current home of the Frick Art Reference Library, which opened to the public on January 14, 1935. The walls of its lobby and third-floor vestibule are made of Indiana limestone. As a staff member of the Library, I have wondered about the biomorphic formations present in these walls. Thinking that they are perhaps fossils, I began to explore this prospect.


Can You Read Me Now?: A Brief History of Italic Script

  • Posted on Mar 02, 2015 by

I have always admired my grandmother’s handwriting. It appeals to my inner Luddite who periodically gets the urge to leave the city and head to the mountains of the Pacific Northwest. To me, the tight lettering and flourishing loops of her “f”s and “g”s are time stamps of an older era that say “I was here.” It is from her that I trace my interest in palaeography and in Classics, of which italic script represents an ideal nexus.

 


Unexpected: A Visual Journey

  • Posted on Oct 12, 2014 by
Untitled Document

Kress Foundation Grant for Image Analysis Toolkit

  • Posted on Aug 01, 2014 by

The Frick Art Reference Library Photoarchive recently received a $25,000 grant from the Kress Foundation to support the creation of a toolkit that will perform computer vision analysis on digitized art historical photo archives. John Resig, Dean of Computer Science at Khan Academy, will carry out the project. This toolkit will be a groundbreaking application of technology that will transform the way photo archives are used.


The Frick/IFA Symposia, 1940–2013

  • Posted on Apr 22, 2014 by

In his introductory speech at the first joint Frick Collection and Institute of Fine Arts (IFA) Symposium on February 23, 1940, Frederick Mortimer Clapp, Director of The Frick Collection, stated that the purpose of the gathering was for graduate students “to do now what you will in a few years…to enlighten us, the older generation…on the results of your preliminary studies” (Clapp, 2


Maps for Monuments Men

  • Posted on Mar 03, 2014 by

During World War II, the Frick Art Reference Library played a pivotal role in the international effort to identify and protect monuments and works of art in Europe from damage and destruction by armed forces. Helen Clay Frick, the founder and Director of the Library, invited the Committee of the American Council of Learned Societies on Protection of Cultural Treasures in War Areas to take up residence at the Library from 1943 to 1945.


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