Delacroix in Morocco

  • Posted on May 22, 2017 by

Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) visited Morocco from January through June of 1832. He was part of the diplomatic mission of Charles-Henri-Edgar, Comte de Mornay. He made drawings and annotations in seven sketchbooks during the trip. The Frick Art Reference Library has facsimiles of two of the sketchbooks.


First-Timers to the ARLIS/NA Conference, Arts du Monde, in New Orleans

  • Posted on Apr 04, 2017 by

Megan De Armond, Assistant Digital and Metadata Librarian/NYARC Web Archiving Technician, and Coral Salomón, NYARC Web Archiving Fellow, currently work at The Frick Art Reference Library. Below, they discuss their first time attending an Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) Conference and what they learned from the experience.

Expectations


Before The Frick: Remembering The Lenox Library

  • Posted on Dec 01, 2016 by

Decades before Henry Clay Frick (1849–1919) moved to New York City and began filling his mansion with artistic masterpieces, another extraordinarily wealthy collector was populating his own mammoth structure with books and art in exactly the same location. James Lenox (1800–1880) was one of the richest men in New York in the second half of the nineteenth century, and one of its most influential philanthropists and bibliophiles.


Digital Art History Comes to The Frick!

  • Posted on Jun 20, 2016 by

Reflecting on the potentially transformative effect that digital technologies hold for the discipline of art history, members of several departments of the Frick Art Reference Library launched the Digital Art History Lab (DAHL) in the fall of 2014 to address the needs of art historians in a digital age. The founding mission of the DAHL is to:


Art of the Park

  • Posted on Nov 23, 2015 by

Central Park’s seven hundred-plus acres make up a nearly perfect rectangle with north, south, east, and west ends, smack dab in the middle of the Manhattan street grid. In the city, no one can escape the park. And even in the park, no one can escape the city, apparent in the skylines of 59th Street, Fifth Avenue, Central Park West, and 110th Street.


Frick Art Reference Library Fossils

  • Posted on Oct 04, 2015 by

The American architect John Russell Pope (1874-1937) designed the current home of the Frick Art Reference Library, which opened to the public on January 14, 1935. The walls of its lobby and third-floor vestibule are made of Indiana limestone. As a staff member of the Library, I have wondered about the biomorphic formations present in these walls. Thinking that they are perhaps fossils, I began to explore this prospect.


Can You Read Me Now?: A Brief History of Italic Script

  • Posted on Mar 02, 2015 by

I have always admired my grandmother’s handwriting. It appeals to my inner Luddite who periodically gets the urge to leave the city and head to the mountains of the Pacific Northwest. To me, the tight lettering and flourishing loops of her “f”s and “g”s are time stamps of an older era that say “I was here.” It is from her that I trace my interest in palaeography and in Classics, of which italic script represents an ideal nexus.

 


Pages